What is the tallest mountain in space

Olympus Mons on Mars: Spectacular series of images from the largest volcano in our solar system

Agency

The largest volcano in our solar system, Olympus Mons, is aptly named after the seat of the Greek gods. Its dimensions are gigantic. With a base diameter of 600 km, it is 22 km high! In contrast, the highest mountain on earth, Mount Everest, with its almost 9 km almost appears to be tiny.

The vertical view of Olympus Mons shows the impressive summit crater of the highest volcano in our solar system. The cauldron-like crater, known as the caldera, reaches a depth of 3 km. The caldera is an extremely complex structure. It is divided into itself, from which the development over time can be derived. The lava lake has collapsed and sagged several times. This means that the oldest material is the highest, the youngest the lowest. The visible caldera structures are at least a few hundred million years old. However, the formation of the volcano began about 3 billion years ago, so the overall structure is very old.
This image is the first high-resolution color image to cover the summit region of Olympus Mons on Mars. The color image was taken on January 21, 2004 from an altitude of 273 km by the HRSC stereo camera. The center of the image is 18.3 degrees north and 227 degrees east. The resolution is 12 m per pixel. South is up.

This 3D image shows a general view of the 22 km high Olympus Mons. Its huge base diameter of 600 km can be clearly seen. The German high-resolution stereo camera HRSC does not yet have so many image strips that could show this huge colossus as an overall view. Therefore, the camera team at the Free University of Berlin, headed by PI Gerhard Neukum, created this overall view from the topographic laser height measurement data from the US Global Surveyor probe (MOLA camera) and the photo mosaic from the Global Surveyor MOC camera.

This perspective view shows the southern section of the impressive caldera of Olympus Mons. The view was generated from the stereo channels, the nadir channel (vertical viewing direction) and the color channels of the HRSC. The image was taken on January 21, 2004 (orbit 37) from an altitude of 273 km. Very fresh, i.e. geologically young, tongue-shaped landslides are clearly visible. The image width is 40 km with a resolution of 12 m per pixel. The center of the image is 18.3 degrees north and 227 degrees east. The vertical exaggeration of the image is 1.8. South is up.

This impressive perspective view shows the cauldron-like volcanic crater of Olympus Mons, the so-called caldera. It reaches a depth of 3 kilometers.
As in Figure 3, this recording was also generated from the stereo channels, the nadir channel (vertical viewing direction) and the color channels of the HRSC. The picture was taken on January 21, 2004 (orbit 37) at an altitude of 273 km. The image width is 102 km with a resolution of 12 m per pixel and is 18.3 degrees north and 227 degrees east in the center of the image. The vertical exaggeration of the image is 1.8. South is up.

The image data recorded by the German high-performance camera HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera) was processed by the Institute for Planetary Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Institute for Geological Sciences at the Free University of Berlin.

Thank you for liking

You have already liked this page, you can only like it once!