What is meant by DOA

Hello!
I dug out the now relatively old SWAT3 again. I think it has one of the best voice synchronizations ("Stop the nonsense and come out!" )
When you report a person who has been shot, he says "Suspect DOA." Does anyone know what the acronym DOA stands for?
Greez, Rambambo
D.ead On A.rrival: mata
THX! And what is the best way to translate that into German? "Dead on arrival"? Isn't that illogical?
Why is that illogical?
Well, dead on whose arrival? To me it sounds like the suspect was already dead when the emergency team marched in. Or does it mean that the suspect was killed when the task force arrived? (<-- das="" vermute="" ich="" mal,="" nur="" w├╝rde="" ich="" es="" dann="" anders="">
It's not illogical at all. You could also say "Dead found when the SWAT team arrived".
Yes, that's illogical! The suspect didn't die of a heart attack and the SWAT team found him by accident, they shot him. Then why "on arrival"?
Who says games are 100% correct?
Maybe that falls under a "cover-up" as well. The SWAT team comes to arrest someone, shoots the target person and says over the radio "oh, he was already dead, we weren't at all".

/ Edit:

If I knew where I left the game, I would reinstall that too. Because it was a lot of fun.
Are you sure it's "DOA"? I'll unpack again and listen to it.

/ edit
Tjo, I have no idea, I would say
Is that only said when the subject dies after being shot or is that also said when the subject is shot? I just couldn't figure that out.
on the Xbox there is a game that is abbreviated to DOA ..... that means Death or Alive : rolleyes
Just a short explanation of what DOA means in "real life":
In the USA (as with us) only a doctor can determine death and in the USA (unlike us) there are no emergency doctors in the rescue service, only paramedics.
This means that all patients, even if they obviously no longer have a chance, are treated by the paramedics and taken to a hospital. The "hopeless cases" are then no longer treated by the doctor in the emergency room, but only declared dead. This is then called "DOA" (= "delivered dead").
QUOTE (Rambambo @ 10/02/2004, 10:47 am)
The suspect didn't die of a heart attack

Why not?
Or he shot himself, or they find a dead hostage, or ... or ... or ... or ...

What the heck is illogical?
QUOTE (Chiron @ 10/03/2004, 1:59 pm)
In the USA (as with us) only a doctor can determine death and in the USA (unlike us) there are no emergency doctors in the rescue service, only paramedics.

Well, they also have a much better education than our RA
QUOTE (Striker @ Oct 3rd 2004, 2:59 pm)
QUOTE (Chiron @ 10/03/2004, 1:59 pm)
In the USA (as with us) only a doctor can determine death and in the USA (unlike us) there are no emergency doctors in the rescue service, only paramedics.

Well, they also have a much better education than our RA

This statement is not correct:
1. The "Paramedic" and "EMT" training courses are not uniformly regulated in the USA. There is a deluge of state, county and city regulations and the internal guidelines of the emergency services.
The level of training is extremely inconsistent, especially in more rural areas there are "Paramedics" that would not even pass as RettSan ...
2. What do you call a "better education"? Because they are taking more invasive measures?
The approach is just completely different: in Germany one tries to create a solid basic knowledge which allows the RettSan / RettAss an independent assessment and options for action.
The training in the USA aims at a more drill-like processing of algorithms ("if symptom A and symptom B, then measure C").
Isn't it also the case in terms of training that the people in Germany should try to take care of the injured person on the spot as well as possible in order to bring him to the hospital in a more or less stable manner, while in the United States it is the case that the injured there are simply injured as quickly as possible be collected and carted to the hospital ?!

With such different systems, I think you can also compare the training net so particularly well.
I only know the system in the US from television, but if I look at it that way, you can probably say it that way.

In the USA "load & go" or "scoop & run" is supposedly popular, while in Germany "stay & play" is mostly practiced. You can actually see this from the fact that the sending of an NA is indicated by default for many things. The danger with "stay & play" is that it quickly turns into "stay & pray", i.e. you get bogged down outside with measures and thus prevent a delivery to the KH, because it should still take place as quickly as possible. The only stupid thing is that you can't actually do much in the ambulance while driving (especially not in the RTH) - the patient should be so stable before starting the journey that no major actions are necessary during the journey itself.

As for an RA training, I honestly don't think training an American Paramedic can be that much better. I know several (L) RA personally and have often seen them at work. They already have a very good knowledge of emergency rescue that is not much inferior to that of an average emergency doctor in this regard (one sometimes wonders what kind of whistles go in the NA service just because that was part of the job advertisement ...).

In Germany, however, it is the case that certain measures are actually reserved for a doctor (this actually includes manual things such as laying an entrance or administering infusions). If an RA takes such a measure because he has mastered it and it is urgently necessary for the patient at the moment, he is acting on the basis of an "emergency competence" (although the subject itself is not that simple) and on the basis of his training.

Take a look at what you have to do in order to become a RettAss, because that's a lot of training.
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