Why didn't Alan Kay like Java

Alan Kay - Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science

AlanKay - a laudatory speech, ladies and gentlemen and Gentlemen, the programming language Smalltalk-80 will be 30 years old this year, its inventor Dr. AlanKay on the other hand, turns 70. At the beginning of the 1980s, Smalltalk triggered a real boom, OOP was the trend par excellence. Let me say a few words at this point AlanKay to lose. Born on May 17, 1940 in Springfield, Massachusetts, he attended the University of Colorado at Boulder and graduated with a bachelor's degree in mathematicsand Molecular biology. He then received his Masters and PhD from the University of Utah College of Engineering. Worked from 1970 Kay at PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). Invented there and he developed the programming language Smalltalk, which in later years was to be the first object-oriented programming language that understood itself in this way. However, Smalltalk was not just a programming language - Smalltalk was much more. Anyone who spoke of small talk did not mean the syntax of the language - because it is so minimal that you can put it on a postcard [1]. No, anyone who talked about small talk meant all the trappings that they brought with them. Smalltalk was a programming language, a graphical development environment anda virtual machine. Everything you saw on the screen could be changed. Everything down to the smallest detail. Why? Quite simply: Smalltalk was written in Smalltalk itselfand could be adjusted at runtime. It should also be noted that this was the state of affairs in 1970-1980. Drafted two years earlier, in 1968 Kay the Dynabook, a laptop / tablet concept primarily intended for children and should enable this access to digital media. A rogue if you look at today's tablets like the iPad and Co. thinks. Instead of explaining to you in great detail why AlanKays contributions to Computer science so important andare significant, I would like to take a different path. Let us ask ourselves how the world today is without AlanKay would look without AlanKay Java would probably still be in its infancy. You have to know that Java applications only run as fast nowadays because Sun Microsystems middle matriculation number 120370


bought a certain company in the 1990s. This company had developed a powerful virtual machine for a Smalltalk system called a HotSpot. After the purchase, this was then further developed into a virtual machine for Java, which should set new standards. [2] Without AlanKay Microsoft would have only recently announced Windows 98 andSteve Jobs would have just given initial presentations of Mac OS 9. Because it was Smalltalk that was the first system to implement concepts that we take for granted today, such as a graphical user interface with pop-up menus and Overlapping windows, mouse sensitivity of most of the objects visible on the screen, etc., and so on. Historically speaking, the Macintosh, the first commercially successful PC, only emergedand was so successful because its operating system relied on exactly these ideas - which ultimately represented something like a revolution in human-computer interaction. When Steve Jobs was presented with a Smalltalk system by PARC employees in the early 1980s that had already implemented all these ideas, it was - to put it mildly - an extremely important one and valuable inspiration for him. [3], [4] Finally, it should be mentioned that without the work of Dr. AlanKays today over 100,000 children from Uruquay and Peru still had no access to computers. The concept of the Dynabook from 1968 mentioned earlier was the Grandlocation for the OLPC project (One Laptop PerChild). This project of the $ 100 laptop for the poorest children in the world would probably not have been nearly as successful if it had not been for the intensive collaboration of Dr. AlanKaycan trust. These were just a few possible scenarios of how the world of Computer science would be ordered nowadays if AlanKay would not have been a contributor to the “computer revolution” from an early age. Currently, Dr. Kay President of the Viewpoint Research Institute [5], which recently launched the Squeak Etoys and Croquet projects. At the moment the VRI is working on a project that has nothing less to do than to “reinvent programming”. Perhaps you should take a closer look at this - in the worst case you will save 30 years of development time. Matriculation number 120370


List of sources [1] http://esug.heeg.de/whyusesmalltalktoteachoop/smalltalksyntaxonapostcard/[2] http://www.strongtalk.org/[3] http://www.smalltalkconsulting.com/html/aRadicalChange.html [ 4] http://www.smalltalk.org/smalltalk/TheEarlyHistoryOfSmalltalk_V.html[5] http://www.viewpointsresearch.org/All internet sources mentioned were last accessed on February 1, 2011. Matriculation number 120370

Alan Kay - a laudation My dear ladies and Gentlemen, this year the programming language Smalltalk-80 is 30 years old, its inventor Dr. Alan Kay , on the other hand, is turning 70. At the beginning of the 1980s, Smalltalk triggered a real boom, OOP was the trend par excellence. At this point, let me say a few words about Alan Kay . Born on May 17, 1940 in Springfield, Massachusetts, he attended the University of Colorado at Boulder and graduated with a bachelor's degree in mathematics and Molecular biology. He then received his Masters and PhD from the University of Utah College of Engineering. From 1970, Kay worked at PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). There he and developed the programming language Smalltalk, which in later years was to be the first object-oriented programming language that understood itself in this way. However, Smalltalk was not just a programming language - Smalltalk was much more. Anyone who spoke of small talk did not mean the syntax of the language - because it is so minimal that you can put it on a postcard [1]. No, anyone who talked about small talk meant all the trappings that they brought with them. Smalltalk was a programming language, a graphic development environment and a virtual machine. Everything you saw on the screen could be changed. Everything down to the smallest detail. Why? Very simple: Smalltalk was written in Smalltalk itself and could be adapted at runtime. It should also be noted that this was the state of affairs in 1970-1980; two years earlier, in 1968, Kay designed the Dynabook, a concept of a laptop / tablet PC primarily intended for children and should enable this access to digital media. A rogue who thinks of today's tablets like iPad and Co. Instead of explaining to you in great detail why Alan Kay 's contributions to computer science are so important and meaningful, would like to I go a different way. Let's ask ourselves what today's world would look like without Alan Kay . Without Alan Kay Java would probably still be are in their infancy. You have to know that Java applications only run as fast nowadays because Sun Microsystems middle matriculation number 120370

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Magazine: Alan Kay - Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science