Do you think musical theater actors exaggerate

Stage language

Original sound:

"Good evening, I would like two tickets for tonight. / Where do you want to go? / In 'Extrablatt'. / No, I'm sorry, we're sold out. No more space available. / Oh no ... / Yes . "

Speaker:

This is what actors call: a short appearance with a faint finish. And for that you reap a lot in the theater ...

Original sound:

"Boo ..."

Speaker:

Only the fine evening wear dragged into the opera house enjoys it. It can disappear quickly and almost without being crumpled into the warm cupboard.

Original sound:

"Hooray!"

Speaker:

The theater-goer himself is anything but entranced. The famous quote by the Russian reformer Mikhail Gorbachev applies to him:

Speaker:

"If you come too late, life punishes you!"

Speaker:

The former head of state of the Soviet Union spoke this sentence on a political stage. But the quote has long since penetrated everyday language in a varied way:

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If you come too late, you won't get any tickets.

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By the way, we're lucky.

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We have Free tickets.

Original sound:

"Hey!"

Speaker:

Free tickets for a look in front of and behind the scenes of a German theater. The language of the theater is of particular interest.

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Tonight at half past seven in Dortmund's opera house, a play that has never been shown in Germany will be about the ramp.

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ramp is called the foremost part of the stage floor, the border to the auditorium. This stage floor is usually inclined slightly forwards so that the audience has a better view of the action.

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In a few minutes, actors, dancers and singers will be there: Im spotlight.

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The spotlight is emitted from a row of lamps at the front end of the stage. The expression is also used outside of the theater: Everyone who appears in public is in spotlight.

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And everyone knows: spotlight caused Stage Fright.

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This is not a serious illness. But it gets hot and cold, inside you shiver and cook at the same time. Like a real fever! But here the cause is nervousness. Nervousness because of an appearance in front of countless eyes and ears.

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Stage Fright there is also behind the scenes in Dortmund. As always before a premiere. Nobody knows if this has been rehearsed for weeks musical a success or a failure.

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A good musical is a musical theater piece that entertains everyone: from blue-collar workers to white-collar workers to academics. It mixes acting, i.e. represented play, with song and dance and music. The musical was created in America in the 19th century. Hence the English name.

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The sold out musical is called "Extra sheet".

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Extra leaves is the name of those newspapers that are published for special events and sensations. And the story of this musical also thrives on sensations and headlines.

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A seemingly harmless man allegedly shot a colored policeman. He is supposed to be hanged for this. This is not only in the interests of journalists who are waiting for sensations, but also in the interests of politicians who are hoping to get colorful votes from his execution.

Music:

Musical "extra sheet"

"... tired of the long wait,

escaped with a revolver and the night is from today

let the editor know, for it

Extra sheet! Extra sheet! ...

Something is finally happening in this city ... "

Speaker:

But it's not there yet. The spectators are still waiting in front of closed doors. Because at the moment it is running Sound check.

Original sound:

"Yes, we give this city what it lacks, what keeps it in suspense ... aiaiaiai."

Speaker:

The word Sound check comes from the American, like many technical terms in the entertainment business. In German means Sound check nothing but sound sample. The sound - the sound effect - has to be right.

Speaker:

The artists step into the spotlight one by one to test the microphones stuck to the forehead or cheek. These amplify the voices in the great musical. Quiet vocal passages also penetrate the orchestra.

Original sound:

"A sensation, or rather two. Radedigogedibom. - All right, Erwin. Thank you."

Speaker:

Shortly after seven, well over a thousand seats in the opera house fill up. Half an hour later it gets quiet in the auditorium. Everything is waiting quietly, but tense. But there are problems with the light behind the stage - as the radio communication between the technicians shows.

Original sound:

"You put something on the backstage, can that be?" / Yes, I have something on the backstage. / So, now plug some cable into backstage two, please. / We already had. / Yes, Bernd, what's going on? The doors are closed. Can we start?"

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The doors to the auditorium are closed. And that usually means: You can start now!

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But some headlights just don't go on. That's unusual - blackout before the start.

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The so-called blackout one expects much later. It describes the sudden darkening, the blackness at the end of the piece - just before the curtain closes. But there are also everyday ones Blackouts. Perhaps you know that: You just knew what you wanted to do or say - a moment later you didn't. That is a spiritual one blackout.

Speaker:

Now here both come together. The reason for the breakdown in the lighting is a carelessness on the part of the technicians - he says Lighting master, the one in charge of the light.

Original sound:

"Yes, a cable broke, the car probably drove over there. / Yes, we have to extend it again."

Speaker:

The audience is put off for a few more minutes, and then, at just before eight, everything is fixed. Now the informer who is responsible for the correct use of light and sound gives the signal. The show begins.

Original sound:

"So, here we go, Carsten. Attention!"

music

Musical "extra sheet"


Speaker:

The view falls into a tall office in Chicago in the 1920s. Smoke from cigarettes and the pungent smell of alcohol are in the air - and so are the sensations that journalists are waiting for here.

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Sensation number one.

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Star reporter Hildy rushes in and declares that he now wants to be a good husband.

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Sensation number two.

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The death row inmate escapes and shows up in the reporter's office. Now Hildy is spoiled for choice. Between a great newspaper story that will make him famous and his fiancée Nathalie, who wants to leave town with him. Between career and love.

Music:

Musical "extra sheet"

"No call tonight when I have them with me. You have better things for me, our night of love, leading actors you and me. / Sweetie, I've been wanting to tell you all along. I have a very last one story to write. It only takes half an hour, I swear / There's always only one left story!"

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story comes from English and is called short story.

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And English and American journalists have always tried to write brief, short stories from life. To increase the curiosity of the reader, of course - and thus the circulation of the newspaper.

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Linguistic contains a story rarely such nice nicknames like my darling. You sweetie By the way, means something like sweet, delicious, appetizing thing.

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The appetizing stories don't always have to be true. There are journalists who tell their story. you rhyme together.

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And so in the theater, wherever people like to exaggerate, this type of journalist is turned into a poet.

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The singer and translator Peter Zeug gave him a voice and funny rhymes:

Music:

"He sits calmly in his Jail,

but before the sun shines

then the executioner calls to death

and his mother who cries. "

Original sound:

"The banality of language is actually conveyed there, where rhymes really are like that flat that the viewer must also notice how flat they are, and I think they sit calmly in their own Jail, so that's really a nice one, flatter Rhyme and to that extent the thing works with the music too, no. "

Speaker:

The word Jail comes from the crooks language and means the prison. There are also parallels in Yiddish. There the word means knas Fine. And if a rhyme flat then it is as flat as the flat land. Simple - and simply stupid!

Speaker:

But not about the characters in the theater flat, but to make it lively and interesting, you have to put a typical language in their mouths. Not only journalists have their way of speaking. Also the reporter's fiancée.

Original sound:

"Which comes out very well with Nathalie, because she is someone who comes from film and speaks in her film world, nech, perfect CastingDream cast, she always says and Fade out at the end. All of these catchphrases in the film. And Fade out, that is natural, these are terms, language that actually cannot be translated. Of course that means fading out, you could say fading out, but now translate something like that. Fade out, that doesn't tell you very much either. And I think the people who are into film know what Fade out is called and everyone who has a video camera today knows it too. It stands Fade in and Fade out. So I think you can just leave the language as it is and don't have to clarify it now to say

we German that too. "

Music:

Musical "extra sheet"

"Whether you are fiancé, music and titles

Fade out …"

Speaker:
There is none at the theater Fade out - unless the visitor closes his eyes tiredly because the plot is so boring or the language is so incomprehensible. Slurred speech, so-called Mumble, is out of place on the stage.

Original sound:

"So that means, here at home I can and do mess around mumblewhich is not possible at all on stage, unless, even if I were to do it in the role, like Kruger, for example, who plays an alcoholic, tries to convey it in language, but he always has to convey that we still understand it, because if there is only one mumbles, I say 'Hey, what did he say?' So, it means always speaking very clearly on stage and especially when singing, bringing out the final consonants, the beginning consonants and that is something that you have to force yourself to do when you say, now everyday life ends, now but the stage language is popular. And then people speak very clearly and distinctly. Of course, if possible, and as I said, if possible in the character as he would say the character, no. And that means certain emphases where you say, I know, he says that and he says that so subliminally, you always have to do it like before ne Magnifying glass hold and say I have to enlarge it. "

Speaker:

If you have something under the microscopeone examines it keenly. Like a detective looking for fingerprints with his magnifying glass.

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The music of "Extrablatt", composed by the Englishman Tony Macaulay, does not leave any marks, but impressions. Permanent! You hum melodies for days without knowing why.

Speaker:

They say the music goes in the ear - and then not out of the head. This is called a real one Catchy tune.

Original sound:

"Earwigsr? Yes what are Catchy tunes? Of course it's incredibly difficult to work the six weeks at a time, then it's all a catchy tune. Then they go home and say, 'Oh, I can't get this tune out of my head'. But of course, we've studied, we hear them three or four times a day. It happened to me that I came out at the London premiere and I have to say, to be honest, I didn't understand that much of the text, but I saw the piece in the vision. I knew it was after a Billy Wilder movie. What got me carried away was really the music, that 'Hey, Hallelujah'. I came out and was in a good mood by saying 'Hey hallelujah' and I could sing that too. And if you have a sad day, then maybe you will take out a part of a ballad, but when I'm actually in a good mood, then I also take with me what made me even better and that might be for the Example just this 'Hey, Hallelujah'. That was good, it put me in the mood and then I'll keep it up. "

Music:

Musical "extra sheet"

"Hey, hallelujah,

He is free, is free at last.

Say goodbye to the newspaper.

Hey hallelujah

he starts his life again

Fuck its reputation.

I am free without question

and I'll leave it at that too

and extra sheet !, extra sheet! ... "

Speaker:

Good bye - goodbye - at the end the star reporter says to his newspaper boss. And then the curtain falls.

Speaker:

A happy ending. For the artists too. Tonight they wowed the audience.

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But tomorrow it will be: New game - new luck.

Questions about the text

Free tickets are ...

1. Tickets for which you don't have to pay anything.

2. Tickets for an outdoor swimming pool.

3. special cards in Skat.

People who are excited before a performance have ...

1. Ringing in the ears.

2. Stage fright.

3. Fear of ramps.

If a person speaks indistinctly, then ...

1. he / she cheats.

2. he / she rustles.

3. he / she mumbles.

Work order

In the group, develop a short stage play in German on a topic of your choice. Distribute the roles. After the rehearsals, during which you will of course pay attention to the clear pronunciation, perform the piece in front of your friends, family and teachers.

Author: Ralph Erdenberger

Editor: Beatrice Warken