What is the difference between asexual and aromantic

My gender


English term for → gay girl. See also → Guy Dyke


English term for → lesbian boy. See also → Girl Fag


A person who is not romantically attracted to others might be aromantic. There is a difference between romantic and sexual attraction. A person can be aromantic (i.e. not romantically attracted to any gender), but homosexual. Or, conversely, a person → asexual, but heteroromantic.

Source: Yannic


A person who is not sexually attracted to others and / or has no desire for sexual interaction could be asexual. However, there are still many different degrees (called Gray asexuality). This includes, for example, demisexuality, which means that people only find others sexually attractive if they have a romantic / emotional bond beforehand.
There is a difference between romantic and sexual attraction. A person can be → aromantic (i.e. not romantically attracted to any gender), but homosexual. Or, conversely, a person asexual but heteroromantic.

Source: Yannic


The term is used to designate people whose body and gender identity function according to the → norm of the → two-gender system: That means people with a “female” body who have a “female” → gender identity or people with a “male” body who have a “male” gender identity.

Standards define which properties are regarded as "normal". In language and art, for example, this is expressed in the fact that deviations from what is regarded as normal are named, while the "normal" properties are tacitly assumed. By not only naming → trans * people but also cis people, it becomes clear that the latter are not “more normal” than trans * people, but just a variant of human life.


If you are attracted to people who share the same gender identity as you, you may identify yourself as homosexual. Like → heterosexual, the word assumes that there are only two → genders, namely men and women. But since there are not just two genders, but a whole → diversity of physical genders and → gender identities, → Inter *, → Trans *), new words have developed that relate more to diversity, such as → pansexual, omnisexual. See also → Sexual Orientation


If you are attracted to people who have a different gender identity than you, you may be referring to yourself as straight. Like → homosexual, the word assumes that there are only two → genders, namely men and women. But because there are not just two genders, but a whole → diversity of physical genders and → gender identities, → Inter *, → Trans *), new words have developed that relate more to diversity, such as → pansexual, omnisexual. See also → Sexual Orientation


Gay girls describe themselves as people with a more female → gender identity or female body, who feel gay in terms of their → sexual orientation and who orient their behavior and communication towards the gay community. The English name is See also → Girl Fag. See also → lesbian boy.


People with a male → gender identity or a male body who feel lesbian in terms of their → sexual orientation and who orient their behavior and communication towards the lesbian community refer to themselves as lesbian boys. The English name is See also → Guy Dyke. See also → gay girl.


In the two-gender system there are only two human genders, namely “man” and “woman”, with certain, clearly separated arrangements of the sexual characteristics. In addition, the two-gender system states that people with a so-called “male” body have a “male” → gender identity, i.e. they feel “as a man” and people with a “female” body feel a “female” gender identity or “as a woman” .

This system is what has been and is being taught to most of us right now. But there are → intersex people who have completely different physical arrangements and → transgender people who, for example, can have a → standardized “male” body, but not the standardized gender identity “male” or a standardized “female” body, but not a female one Gender identity.


If you have a male → gender identity and you are attracted to people who have the same gender identity as you, then you may identify yourself as gay. If you don't care what gender identity the person you find attractive has, then you may refer to yourself as → pansexual (omnisexual) or → bisexual. See also → sexual orientation and → gay girl.

For the whole comic → this way. To enlarge the pictures on this page, you just have to click on them.


If you have a female → gender identity and find people attractive who share the same gender identity as you, you may identify yourself as a lesbian. If you don't care what gender identity the person you find attractive has, then you may refer to yourself as → pansexual (omnisexual) or → bisexual. See also → sexual orientation and → lesbian boy.

For the whole comic → this way. To enlarge the pictures on this page, you just have to click on them.


If you don't care what gender identity the person you find attractive is, then you may be calling yourself
as pansexual or omnisexual. If you think there are only men or women, then you are more likely to refer to yourself as → bisexual.


A person who describes himself as bisexual usually means that he or she likes both women and men. Like → lesbian or → gay, the word assumes that there are only two → genders, namely men and women. But since there are not just two genders, but a whole → diversity of physical genders and → gender identities, → Inter *, → Trans *), new words have developed that relate more to diversity, such as → pansexual, omnisexual. See also → Sexual Orientation.


Even if you have been learning in school so far, there are only two → genders, namely man and woman: It is not true. Humanity consists of a course of physical genders and → gender identities).

For the whole comic go → this way. To enlarge the pictures on this page, you just have to click on them.


Gender is the term used to describe the human body with primary (everything that is already there at birth, e.g. clitoris / penis) and secondary (everything that develops during puberty, e.g. hair growth, muscle mass) gender characteristics. In the → two-gender system there are only two human genders, namely “man” and “woman”, with certain, clearly separated arrangements of the sexual characteristics.

In addition, the two-gender system states that people with a so-called “male” body have a “male” → gender identity, that is, they feel “as a man” and people with a “female” body feel a “female” gender identity or “as a woman” . But there are → intersex people who have completely different physical arrangements and → transgender people who, for example, can have a → norm-compliant body, but not the norm-compliant gender identity.

For the whole comic go → this way. To enlarge the picture on this page, you just have to click on it.

By the way, “sex” means “gender” in English, not “having sex”, so don't be surprised ...


For the whole comic → this way. To enlarge the pictures on this page, you just have to click on them.


Stands for L.esbian S.chwul B.i Trans * I.nter * Queer or in English accordingly for L.esbian Gay B.isexual Trans I.ntersex Queer. There are abbreviations that do not contain all of these terms and those that go beyond them (e.g. LGBTIQQ - the last “Q” stands for “Questioning”). Historically, the back letters were added later. Within the respective communities there is disagreement about how broad associations should be, and also about whether the practice lives up to the claim to actually represent all groups / identities named in the respective abbreviations.

(Source, among others: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


Historically the oldest term for → intersex, which goes back to the ancient myth of the hermaphroditus. Until the beginning of the 20th century it was used together with → hermaphrodite / hermaphroditism as the main term for bodies that cannot be classified in the → norm of so-called “male” or “female” bodies. The term was still used in medicine until a few years ago.

(Source, among others: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


Something that is considered "abnormal". This term expresses, especially when it is applied to people, that the “abnormal” is seen as negative. See also → Norm.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


"NGOs" (Non Governmental Organizations, or in German: NGOs, non-governmental organizations, non-governmental organizations) try to improve the situation of certain groups of people, for example trans *, inter * and gender-queer people, but also animals or the environment by engage in political lobbying, educate the public, call on governments to change their policies and make it clear that rights are violated and that people (or animals or the environment) are badly treated. They usually know very well about current developments in the political and legal sector. Each NGO concentrates on its special topic. A very well-known NGO, for example, is Greenpeace, which is committed to protecting our environment and animals.

(Source: Team from www.meingeschlecht.de)


The underscore “_” recognizes and indicates that physically and psychologically not only the poles “male” and “female” exist, but a whole continuum of gender and gender identities. Example: pupils, teachers, pedagogues. See also → asterisk.


Rejecting the bisexual heterosexual norm. As a bisexual norm, we refer to the social requirement that every person is either male or female, as well as ideas about which characteristics go hand in hand with the respective gender. The two genders are viewed as opposites and a heterosexual desire is assumed. Queer is also often used with regard to sexual orientation and is then another word for lesbian, gay, bisexual, pansexual etc.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


The asterisk “*” recognizes and indicates that physically and mentally not only the poles “male” and “female” exist, but a whole continuum of gender and gender identities. Example: students, teachers, educators. See also → underscore.


The inner knowledge and / or feeling that one is female, male, trans *, between the sexes, beyond the sexes, neither-nor, etc. The gender identity is independent of the body. People whose bodies correspond to the → norm for a certain gender identity often assume that both automatically belong together (e.g. if a person with a body that is classified as “male” by their environment also has a male gender identity).

For the whole comic go → this way. To enlarge the pictures on this page, you just have to click on them.


As the word is usually used, it describes the changes that are brought about by medical, legal or everyday practical and symbolic measures to adapt to the perceived gender in a person's life, or the time in which these changes take place. These can be physical changes, using a new name, getting new papers, new behaviors or doing without previous ones, and much more. It varies from person to person which changes are made or aimed at.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


Or mostly trans *. The asterisk is a placeholder for any ending. Trans * stands for transsexual, transgender, trans man, trans woman, etc. Trans * denotes both people who live in a different sex than that assigned to them at birth and people who do not even assign themselves to a gender category who change genders or feel that they belong to multiple genders. It is important that the term trans * includes very different people with very different self-definitions and biographies who do not necessarily share the same experiences or pursue the same interests.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


In medicine and psychology, syndrome means that there are several symptoms (so-called "signs of illness"). So when something is called a syndrome, it means that the person is considered to be "sick".

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


The stigma describes the fact that a property deviates undesirably from what the general public expects. By the general public determining what to expect and what is accordingly considered to be deviations, and also determining which deviations are "undesirable", individuals who have these characteristics are stigmatized. The whole process is called stigma. Stigmatization is accompanied by discrimination and other injustice.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)


Rejecting the bisexual heterosexual norm. As a bisexual norm, we refer to the social requirement that every person is either male or female, as well as ideas about which characteristics are associated with the respective gender. The two genders are viewed as opposites and a heterosexual desire is assumed.

(Source: Barth / Böttger / Ghattas / Schneider (ed.): Inter. Experiences of intersex people in the world of two genders. Berlin: NoNo Verlag 2013)