Is it wrong to post selfies?

Study of Selfie Obsession"Selfitis" gives it really

The word might sound funny at first - but it isn't. In a new study, researchers have dealt intensively with "selfitis", i.e. with the tendency to obsessively take selfies.

Hand on heart: how many selfies have you already taken today? One, five, more? Perhaps you are - many of us are - a case of "selfitis". A new study by Nottingham Trent University and the Indian Thiagarajar School of Management assumes three levels:

  • Borderline Selfitis: Take but don't post selfies three times a day
  • Acute: Take and post at least three selfies per day
  • Chronic: Take selfies around the clock and post at least six of them daily

Conclusions about the personality?

The research team developed 20 statements for a diagnosis, for example "I feel more popular when I post my selfies on social media" or "If I don't take selfies, I feel cut off from my peer group" or "I use image editing, so that my selfie looks better than anyone else's. "

"The experts say: People who typically suffer from selfitis seek attention above all else. They lack self-confidence."
Anna Kohn, Deutschlandfunk Nova

With the selfies, people would try to be part of a group and to push their social position.

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But there are already psychologists who criticize this study. The Telegraph quotes Dr. Mark Salter of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, who says: "Right now we are always trying to label all kinds of human behavior with a single word. It is dangerous because there are things where there is none."

The authors themselves mention another point of criticism of the study: 90 percent of the participants were under 25 years of age. That is not representative of a whole society.

By the way, three years ago there was quite a lot of talk about "Selfitis". In 2014 it was still a fake news story. But that is exactly what inspired the psychologists from Nottingham and India to now conduct this real study.

"The tests were carried out with a total of more than 600 students in India."
Anna Kohn, Deutschlandfunk Nova
  • Because India has the largest number of Facebook users
  • Because most fatal accidents happen while taking selfies in India: 76 out of 127 worldwide, the study says
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