What is a dust cyclone

What is a cyclone and what is a cyclone?

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What is a cyclone and what is a cyclone?

Even the word cyclone has a dangerous ring to it - and cyclones are actually not harmless. Especially in India you have to fear them. And what is a cyclone in contrast to the cyclone? Sarah from Ernstthal would like to know.

With the term cyclone one describes a tropical cyclone that occurs in a certain area.

A cyclone is the name of a tropical cyclone in the Bay of Bengal, i.e. on the northern and southern Indian Ocean. Cyclones can threaten India and Bangladesh as well as Mauritius and Madagascar, among others.

Cyclones in the Bay of Bengal often flood entire areas of Bangladesh and sometimes kill hundreds of thousands. That hits the people living there hard because there is great poverty in Bangladesh.

A tropical cyclone like the cyclone unfolds its greatest energy over the warm, at least 27 degrees warm tropical ocean in a uniformly humid and warm air mass. Cyclones can take on huge dimensions, the storm systems often have a diameter of several hundred to 1000 kilometers.
Other terms for cyclones in other parts of the world are, for example, hurricane, typhoon or Willy Willy.

The other term that was asked for is called Cyclones. This is a technical term from the weather language. In meteorology it is used to describe a low pressure area.

It is called "cyclonal" when the air in the northern hemisphere moves counterclockwise around an area of ​​low air pressure (i.e. a cyclone).

Cyclonic weather is a weather that is under the influence of a low pressure zone and is often accompanied by rain and cloud cover. In contrast, there is the anticyclonic weather. This describes weather that is characterized by high pressure areas and is generally associated with clear skies and sunshine.

You can find out more in our WAS IST WAS TV episode Climate.

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