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Music blog - at 31 you're musically dead

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When did you stop discovering new music? According to a study, the spirit of discovery ends at 31. "Nonsense," you might say now. "Easy," I say. Almost everything is fine with you and your lazy brain. All you are looking for is a bit of luck.

The bad news first: pop music stays young. Not you. If you get on the «everything used to be better» track, you have no chance and end up in the frustrated endless loop of your stuck musical universe. Then you look for dopamine in crumbs between songs that once meant the world to you.

The good news: Pop music stays young. Not you. If you accept that, you have a chance, even at the age of 40, 50 or 60+, to miraculously discover new music that means something to you.

Gregi Sigrist

Music journalist for pop / rock from Swiss radio and television

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In the music blog he looks up, under and behind current music topics and their background noises.

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I claim: Everyone gets a window of time to discover free music that touches you deeply. It starts sometime in childhood, continues incredibly excitingly through puberty, and gains quality in adulthood. The last time I was given my musical horizons broadened when I was around 30, when I was allowed to discover the country. After that it got more exhausting.

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When you are 27 you discover new music the most. At 31, the great discovery phase is over. 72% of those surveyed feel stuck in their musical tastes. 39% would like to spend more time discovering music in the future.

This is the result of a study by the music streaming platform Deezer. 1000 people aged 18 and over were interviewed.

Do you still listen to new music?

Anyone who knows Michael Jackson doesn't need Bruno Mars, I use to say. I don't mean to downplay the qualities of Mars. But the reason why Mars can pick up someone like me is solely because his songs remind me of music that I have long known. So Mars was never a discovery for me. He's a chef who made me a new dish that I like.

Whether we like it or not: experience weakens curiosity and makes us inflexible. Those who do not actively fight against it run the risk of losing the gift of expanding musical horizons. Supposedly new music that touches you often turns out to be a warm-up product on closer inspection. I'm not talking about obvious cover versions. I'm talking about melodies, arrangements, sounds or playing techniques that are familiar to us. In other words: Nobody needs Wolfmother if he knows Led Zeppelin.

The brain rots in old heads

There was a time when people died on average when they were 40 years old. At that time there was no comparable pop music - but from a pop technical point of view that would be an ideal age for a happy death. These days, at 40, we have our midlife crisis. In order to survive this, we do further training, buy ridiculous sports cars or climb high mountains. We do things that we would have found easier when we were 20 or were simply not necessary for our existence.

It is very similar with the musical spirit of discovery. The rock face to be climbed stands in front of us. At 20, we would have reached the summit before considering whether it was worth the effort. At 40+ we think we know what to expect up there. As a result, we miss opportunities and do not get our much-needed dopamine.

The dopamine addiction

The happiness hormone dopamine is the key to the success of any pop song. Music that we loved when we were young has the power to release this hormone. This is what we want to experience again as people get older, and therefore our laziness leads us to consume warm-up products and to leave the above-mentioned rock face just a rock face.

That is by no means objectionable. But: Whoever wants to experience new pop music intensively, even as a long-time pop fan who is no longer young, has to exert himself and his brain. The associated effort does not necessarily lead to a satisfactory emotional state. But the effort can be worth it, because with a bit of bite, the aging pop fan will also discover new happiness.

Travis Scott: Death and Rebirth

I learned how stuck my understanding of pop has become a few years ago when Travis Scott became a mass phenomenon. I had to try more than a little to understand what this musician has to offer the world.

What initially felt like the involuntary anchoring in front of a hideous, but apparently coveted island, developed for me into a ray of hope in current pop music. Scott's music gave me the confidence that innovation is alive. And so my relation to current music died a small death and at the same time celebrated a great rebirth.

New fodder - new luck

Pop music stays young. Not you. Anyone who knows how to deal with it knows the way in which new pop music can remain important even in old age. The best thing about it: Anyone who is willing to take a few detours and make a certain effort to keep open ears and an open music heart will occasionally and unexpectedly also get things for free.

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  • Comment from Patrick Meury (xeury)
    In this "study" I would fail completely.

    36, Music (sound / rhythm) = elixir of life, always, forever and if not more, then let's get out of here.

    "At 31 you're musically dead" ... pretty wrong, the title. But you did it and tempted me to read this article ...
    Wasted enough time ... doh
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  • Comment from Yves Rittener (YGR)
    A small note: In the years 2000-2010 I was very happy to listen to David Gray. From 2010 until today: Adele. The human voice can move us again and again.
    As a die-hard guitarist, I realized far too late how important singers are. New voices keep popping up. And we can just feast on it.
    Tonight I'll hear Faber and Steiner & Madleina: A real treat. Such sensitive and honest music. Soon I'll be 60.
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  • Comment from Yves Rittener (YGR)
    I find this article stupid.
    My favorites in music were mainly active in the 60s: Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Tim Buckley, James Carr, Otis Redding, Kinks, Janis Joplin, Peter Green and many others.
    But: Voices like Adele, Lewis Capaldi, Bono, Anthony Kiedis etc. have always inspired me. Unfortunately, it is the melodies that run out, which explains “everything was better in the past” well.
    John Peel set me an example of how to love new music. Remember.
    Agree Agree to the comment Select answers to reply to the comment

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